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Te reo me te tikanga Maori 

We are fortunate at Clevedon School to have whaea Ani teach each class for 1 hour per week for Maori language and culture. 

Our te reo programme is based on the Ministry of Education's curriculum guidelines for teaching and learning te reo in English-medium schools. 

 

Our karakia for the term can be accessed by clicking here

Tōtara focus:

This term the new entrants in Room 5 began with a shared reading book called ‘Te Rā o Māmā’ (Mothers’ Day) and created cards with loving messages to our mum or nana. Now we learning how to greet one another i.e. Tēna koe (hello to one person) or Tēnā koutou (to the whole class). We will learn how to introduce ourselves, how to introduce our mum and dad, how to say how old we are and what country we come from.

Ko ………….. au,

Ko ………….. tōku māmā

Ko ………….  tōku pāpā

E rima ōku tau

Nō Aotearoa au.

 

The rest of the Tōtara team began the term learning how to count, understand and use numbers to twenty. Tahi, rua, toru, whā, rima, ono, whitu, waru, iwa, tekau, tekau-mā tahi, tekau mā rua,…….. ,rua tekau.

We are also learning how to ask and answer questions about how we are feeling, as part of everyday conversations. Kei te pēhea koe? (How are you?)  Kei te ………..au/ahau. (I am ……….. ).  Me koe? (And you?). We are learning the kupu (words) for some likely feelings to respond with e.g pai (good,fine), i.e. Kei te pai au. (I’m fine). Other kupu we might use: ora (well), māuiui (sick), harikoa (happy), pōuri (sad), riri (angry), makariri (cold), wera (hot), hiakai (hungry), hiainu (thirsty), hiamoe (sleepy).

During the second half of the term we will be learning about Matariki, the stars that make up Matariki and the Māori values and affiliations with nature that they are associated with. We will learn some whakatauki (Māori proverbs) that relate to these concepts, and get a sense of how Māori celebrate the completion of the yearly cycle of seasons and prepare for the new.

 

Pohutukawa focus:

We began the term with a focus on pronunciation and particularly the vowel blends which we find quite tricky. Then we will learn how to ask and answer questions about how we are feeling as part of everyday conversations. Kei te pēhea koe? (How are you?)  Kei te ………..au/ahau. (I am ……….. ). Me koe? (And you?). We are learning the kupu (words) for some likely feelings to respond with e.g pai (good,fine), i.e. Kei te pai au. (I’m fine). Other kupu we might use: ora (well),māuiui (sick), harikoa (happy), pōuri (sad), riri (angry), makariri (cold), wera (hot), hiakai (hungry), hiainu (thirsty), hiamoe (sleepy).

 

Linking in with our inquiry around the water cycle we will learn about the Māori purakau (legends) and understandings around the weather phenomena and‘wai’(water) - that it is a taonga handed down to us to use and protect, that it has its own mauri (life-force) and we are the kaitiaki (guardians). For example a stream has a mauri that enables fish and stream life to live. Take away, damage or degrade the mauri and a whole community would suffer.

During the second half of the term we will be learning about Matariki, the stars that make up Matariki and the Māori values and affiliations with nature that they are associated with. We will learn some whakatauki (Māori proverbs) that relate to these concepts, and get a sense of how Māori celebrate the completion of the yearly cycle of seasons and prepare for the new.

Kauri focus

Linking with our inquiry unit we are learning some of the language around hauora (health and well-being), and in particular the kupu for our body and facial features. We will learn how to describe ourselves and others using simple descrptive sentences. e.g. He tāroaroa ahau. He makawe mingimingi ōku. He karu kahurangi ōku. (I am tall. I have curly hair. I have blue eyes).  He poto ia. He makawe urekehu ōna. He mōhiti ōna. (He/she is short. He/she has blonde hair. He/she wears glasses.  

As Matariki approaches we will be learning about the month of Matariki, the stars that make up Matariki and the Māori values and affiliations with nature that they are associated with. We will learn some whakatauki (Māori proverbs) that relate to these concepts, and get a sense of how Māori celebrate the completion of the yearly cycle of seasons and prepare for the new.

 

Kōwhai focus:

We began the term continuing on with the hauora theme from last term using the language we have been learning about being unwell and about accidental injuries to create conversational skits in groups , incorporating kīwaha (colloquial idioms). Students may present them as live drama or as videos or animations with voice-over.

During the second half of the term we will be learning about time, seasons and Matariki, the stars that make up Matariki and their roles and the Māori values and affiliations with nature that they are associated with. We will learn some whakatauki (Māori proverbs) that relate to these concepts, and research some of the traditional activities at this season and get a sense of how Māori celebrate the completion of the yearly cycle of seasons and prepare for the new.